dynamicafrica

dynamicafrica:

'Sista Girls' by Bindi Cole:

The term ‘Sistagirl’ is used to describe a transgender person in Tiwi Island culture. Traditionally, the term was ‘Yimpininni’.  The very existence of the word provides some indication of the inclusive attitudes historically extended towards Aboriginal sexual minorities.

Colonisation not only wiped out many indigenous people, it also had an impact on Aboriginal culture and understanding of sexual and gender expression.

As Catholicism took hold and many traditions were lost, this term became a thing of the past. Yimpininni were once held in high regard as the nurturers within the family unit and tribe much like the Faafafine from Samoa. As the usage of the term vanished, tribes’ attitudes toward queer indigenous people began to resemble that of the western world and religious right. Even today many Sistergirls are excluded from their own tribes and suffer at the hands of others.

Within a population of around 2500, there are approximately 50 ‘Sistagirls’ living on the Tiwi Islands. This community contains a complex range of dynamics including a hierarchy (a queen Sistergirl), politics, and a significant history of pride and shame. The Sistagirls are isolated yet thriving, unexplored territory with a beauty, strength and diversity to inspire and challenge.

(via tracksoot)

18-15n-77-30w
18-15n-77-30w:

lostinurbanism:

Over the weekend, I took my daughter to an exhibit on segregation. I observed her. I observed her emotions and she had so many questions and I’m still searching for answers…. I wanted her to touch and see the way of life for many of our parents and grandparents. Some of us may have even experienced it ourselves..
Then, there’s a different type of conversation one must have with our black children.. The robes and signs may not be visible but the tension can still be felt. Therefore, the fight must continue.

…necessary poison.

18-15n-77-30w:

lostinurbanism:

Over the weekend, I took my daughter to an exhibit on segregation. I observed her. I observed her emotions and she had so many questions and I’m still searching for answers…. I wanted her to touch and see the way of life for many of our parents and grandparents. Some of us may have even experienced it ourselves..

Then, there’s a different type of conversation one must have with our black children.. The robes and signs may not be visible but the tension can still be felt. Therefore, the fight must continue.

…necessary poison.

cultureunseen

cultureunseen:

Salute to Sister Soldier Yuri Kochiyama!

Born May 19, 1921 (93 years young and strong)
An extraordinary Japanese American woman who spoke out and fought shoulder-to-shoulder with African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and Whites for social justice, civil rights, and prisoners and women’s rights in the U.S. and internationally for over half a century. A prolific writer and speaker on human rights, Kochiyama has spoken at over 100 colleges and universities and high schools in the U.S. and Canada.

http://www.amazon.com/Heartbeat-Struggle-Revolutionary-Kochiyama-Critical/dp/0816645930